It’s an era of hyper-competition. It’s no longer just other FM and AM stations we’re contending with… It’s Sirius/XM, Pandora, YouTube, etc., etc. So, how well are stations (and radio in general) satisfying listeners?

To find out, we completed 649 telephone interviews with 18-64 radio listeners in the U.S., conducted from February 1-5. We asked about their satisfaction with the station they “listen to most” (if they have one) and their satisfaction with radio overall. Here’s what we learned…

Nearly half  say they’re “100% satisfied” with the station they listen to most. Another third give it a “four” on our five-point satisfaction scale…meaning they’re mostly satisfied:

1: NOT AT ALL SATISFIED   1%
2:   2%
3: 14%
4: 33%
5: 100% SATISFIED 48%
Don’t know/No st’n “listen most”   2%
AVERAGE: 4.3

So, the overwhelming majority of listeners are satisfied with their P1 station.

Some might argue that “Of course…it’s the station they listen to most!” But remember,  stations can be listeners’  P1’s because they are “the lesser of the evils,” the only station that plays country (or whatever) in their market, or an involuntary choice – like the station they’re subjected to at work. Whatever the reason, dissatisfied listeners are a very small minority.

Comparing formats, we find that most fall within the average range. But 61% of Public station P1’s and 77% of Christian station P1’s are 100% satisfied with that station, for average scores of 4.6 and 4.7, respectively! On the below-average side, 30% of A/C P1’s and 35% of CHR P1’s are 100% satisfied, and both formats average 4.0 on our satisfaction scale.

Now, beyond satisfaction with the station they listen to most, how do listeners feel about radio overall? I’ll report on that later this week.

(A note about methodology: We did not ask the format of the station they listen to most…that would be a classic case of asking a question respondents can’t answer! Instead, we took call letters, dial position, nickname, etc., and combined with their location determined each station’s format. Cell phone respondents were not included in the format breakouts, because we didn’t have their location.)